Parshat B’ha’alotcha • Numbers 8:1-12:16

“The Eternal One spoke to Moses, saying: “Speak to Aaron and say to him, ‘when you mount the lamps, – b’ha’alotcha et ha’ne’rot el mul p’nei ha’m’norah – let the seven lamps give light at the front of the lampstand.’
-Numbers 8:1-2

The menorah is one of the most recognizable symbols of our Jewish community. From our own spaces of worship here at Temple to the walls and stained glass windows of sanctuaries throughout the world; from Jewish organizational letterheads to the seal of the State of Israel. We know the image of the menorah and claim it as our own. Many of us identify most intensely with the menorah as a functional yet triumphant piece of Temple property reclaimed by the Hasmoneans – descendants of Aaron – after the Maccabean victory, giving light to a dark Temple over a period of eight miraculous nights. This seven-branched symbol is a statement of solidarity, unity, and strength – and it traces its roots to the Tent of Meeting mentioned throughout Torah and here in parshat B’ha’alotcha.

The use of the word b’ha’alotcha in the opening sentence of the parsha is striking. B’ha’alotcha contains within it the same root as the word aliyah, meaning to ascend or rise up. God does not speak to Moses and simply say, “Tell Aaron to turn on the lights.” Rather, God refers here to the act of kindling flame as a rising up; an ignition and a spark. The use of this particular word elevates what would ordinarily be a functional task into something more; something holy.

My friend and teacher Rabbi Darren Kleinberg once explained parshat B’ha’alotcha as a reminder of the potential spark that can be ignited in the exchange between humans, particularly in the realm of Jewish leadership. When a match is struck against a coarse surface it causes a brief, brilliant spark to ascend into the air, followed by a glowing gold light. Similarly, when leaders, committees and entire boards come together to share and explore passions and stir within one another the desire to create a better future, that spark of an idea or a purpose turns to a glittering series of possibilities with the light of the future and its potential raising us to unlimited heights.

Tomorrow evening in Seattle we will celebrate the leadership of our congregation – honoring those who have served our community with dedication and devotion and welcoming our newest leaders into a cadre of committed congregants. May their light and warmth increase and continue to inspire, raising up each and every one of us to the heights we do not yet realize we can achieve. We invite you to celebrate our Board Installation and Volunteer Appreciation Shabbat at 6pm in Seattle tomorrow – let us welcome and kindle that sacred, inspiring light together!

Rabbi Jaclyn Cohen

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